Government Printing Press Trivia (11 posts)

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  • Profile picture of John  Bravo John Bravo said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Of the following denominations, which did the government print the most of in 2012?

    $1
    $2
    $5
    $10
    $20
    $50
    $100

  • Profile picture of catpaw catpaw said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    There is an increased demand for $20 bills and $100 dollar bills. $100 dollar bills, as I understand, are printed slightly differently for overseas circulation and at-home spending.
    My guess would be the $1 bill, since it gets the most circulation and wear and tear.

  • Profile picture of Groucho Groucho said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    $20

  • Profile picture of John  Bravo John Bravo said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    http://www.moneyfactory.gov/uscurrency/annualproductionfigures.html

    THe answer to me is shocking.

  • Profile picture of catpaw catpaw said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    No fair–my machine is not picking up the link. Grrr.

  • Profile picture of John  Bravo John Bravo said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Its $100. Interesting site. Shows printing of all the denominations for the last 3 decades. Something is not right if this country is printing more $100s than $1′s.

  • Profile picture of Groucho Groucho said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Sounds like prosperity to me, especially for drug and gun dealers.

  • Profile picture of think4yourself think4yourself said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    I’m no economist, however, my guess would be that the $100, because of its denomination size, doesn’t see frequent enough circulation to get it back into the supply. Banks, if I’m not mistaken will retire certain bills and get new ones from the fed. Then the old ones returned to the fed are destroyed. But only banks do this. And since most retailers don’t accept anything larger than a $20 and most large purchases (bills, groceries, etc) are charged to check or plastic, the $100 bill becomes a piece of paper that we have to go to the bank to break into $20′s. The $50 dollar bill is equally as useless since there are plenty of 20′s and 10′s in circulation. $100 bills seem to disappear out of circulation, I suspect, because the end up collecting dust in bank vaults, never seeing an actual register. My question is, why recirculate a pointless bill? For Vegas’s sake?

  • Profile picture of Deleted User said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    “And since most retailers don’t accept anything larger than a $20″

    I must be going to differant places than you, I have never had a $100 or $50 turned down. Coin of the realm and legal for all debts public and private.

  • Profile picture of Deleted User said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    Most people that would have $100 to their name just swipe their credit card for anything worth that much. Cash is what you put in a vending machine, and even vending machines are starting to go plastic. Only drug dealers and prostitutes (well, maybe not the prostitutes in Bakersfield-they aint worth $20) carry with them paper 50′s and 100s anymore.

  • Profile picture of Deleted User said 1 year, 7 months ago:

    How very wrong you are.